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Cold Diuresis

Cold Diuresis according to Wikipedia


The kidney produces up to 250 L of "prourine" (glomerular filtrate in science) per day, but reabsorbs most before it reaches the bladder.


Polyuria is increased diuresis. This may be due to large fluid intake, various illnesses (diabetes insipidus, osmotic diuresis due to diabetes mellitus or hypercalcemia) or various chemical substances (diuretics, caffeine, alcohol). It may also occur after supraventricular tachycardias, during an onset of atrial fibrillation, childbirth, and the removal of an obstruction within the urinary tract. Diuresis is restrained by antidiuretics such as ADH, angiotensin II and aldosterone.


Cold diuresis is the occurrence of increased urine production on exposure to cold.


Substances that increase diuresis are called diuretics. Coffee is an example of a proposed diuretic.


Substances that decrease diuresis allow more vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) to be present in the kidney.

When you feel cold and have cold feet and hands do you have frequent toilet visits? Why? The body protects vital organs from cooling by reducing the blood flow to the outer layers of the body. More warm blood is kept in and around the body’s core, increasing the volume and pressure at the same time. Unfortunately, the brain may perceive this as an unnecessary increase. It instructs the kidneys to extract some of the fluids from the blood and shed it as urine.


Once the reason for the cold is eliminated, the blood flows back to the periphery. A frequent toilet trip, however, reduced fluid levels considerably and the body may experience mild dehydration.

index

cold and heart disorders

High-altitude diuresis occurs at altitudes above 10,000 ft and is a desirable indicator of adaptation to high altitudes. Mountaineers who are adapting well to high altitudes experience this type of diuresis. Urine output is thus an important indicator of adaptation to altitude (or lack thereof). Persons who produce less urine even in the presence of adequate fluid intake probably are not adapting well to altitude